Tuesday, August 22, 2017
Breaking News
Goldsboro Farmers Market Opens This Friday Posted 8 months 3 weeks ago
Be Santa To A Senior This Holiday Season Posted 8 months 3 weeks ago
The Case For & Against Adam Putnam Posted 8 months 3 weeks ago
Gartners Top 10 Tech Predictions Posted 9 months 3 weeks ago
New Florida Poll Shows Trump Up Posted 9 months 3 weeks ago
Septic Is Ruining Our State Posted 9 months 3 weeks ago
Album Review: "Ruminations" by Conor Oberst Posted 10 months 1 week ago
PREVIEW: Conor Oberst "Ruminations" Posted 10 months 2 weeks ago
How 9/11 Reshaped My Generation Posted 11 months 2 weeks ago
Hollerbach's Announces Sanford Oktoberfest Posted 11 months 2 weeks ago
Wayback Burgers Opens In Mt. Dora Posted 1 year 1 week ago
Florida Blue Expanding To Seminole County Posted 1 year 3 weeks ago
Seminole County Artist Marla E Honored Posted 1 year 1 month ago
Star Wars Themed Tree Suspended Tents? Posted 1 year 1 month ago
Apartment Living in Lake Mary Posted 1 year 2 months ago
Heavy Rains Force Need For More Storage Posted 1 year 6 months ago
5 Books Every Politico Needs This Christmas Posted 1 year 8 months ago
Patrick Murphy - The Master of Flip-Flops Posted 1 year 8 months ago
Seminole Clerk Retires, Endorses Successor Posted 1 year 9 months ago
Ted 2 Much Better Than First Film Posted 2 years 1 month ago
Wanderlust And The Joys Of Travel Posted 2 years 2 months ago
Andy Gardiner's Game of Thrones Posted 2 years 2 months ago
The Truth About The Everglades Land Purchase Posted 2 years 3 months ago
Space Exploration: Our Future, Today Posted 2 years 3 months ago
Lollapalooza's Lineup Is Lollapalovely Posted 2 years 4 months ago
6 Questions for Carly Fiorina Posted 2 years 4 months ago
Sweetwater 420 Fest Is Gonna Be Dope Posted 2 years 5 months ago
Dressgate: Has Adobe solved the mystery? Posted 2 years 5 months ago
6 Questions For Rand Paul Posted 2 years 6 months ago
First Look - Little Econ Love Fest 2015 Posted 2 years 6 months ago
A Few Thoughts On Music & Music Festivals Posted 2 years 7 months ago
How To Speak Startup Posted 2 years 8 months ago
Sunblock Making You Impotent? Posted 2 years 9 months ago
A Girl and A Gigabyte - FaceTime Audio Posted 2 years 10 months ago
It Makes $ense to Develop Your Personal Brand Posted 2 years 10 months ago
A Girl and A Gigabyte - Canon Pixma Review Posted 2 years 10 months ago
Our Endorsements in House District 28 & 30 Posted 2 years 12 months ago
Our Pick - GOP Primary In CD 7 Posted 2 years 12 months ago
Sunshine Law Indictments: A Primer Posted 3 years 2 months ago
Getting Central Florida Moving Posted 3 years 2 months ago
Bortles Drafted By Jaguars Posted 3 years 3 months ago
The SunRail Shell Game Posted 3 years 3 months ago
First Day Seminole Tax Hike Voting Numbers Posted 3 years 4 months ago
April In Historic Seminole County Posted 3 years 4 months ago
Seminole County Vegetarian Eats Under $10 Posted 3 years 5 months ago
Zuckerberg Out To Rule The World? Posted 3 years 5 months ago
Lessons Learned From Flappy Bird Posted 3 years 6 months ago
Shane's Weekly Music Picks Posted 3 years 6 months ago
The Good Neighbors Farmers Market Posted 3 years 6 months ago
Facebook Turns 10 - Unveils "Paper" App Posted 3 years 6 months ago
What Is The Seminole County Post? Posted 3 years 6 months ago
It's Working In Seminole County Posted 3 years 6 months ago
Baking Tip - Organic Ingredients A Must Posted 3 years 6 months ago
Vintage Shopping At It's Best Posted 3 years 6 months ago
Life With MS - Dr. Mark Cascione Posted 3 years 6 months ago
It's Time To Convert The - In Your Life To Posted 3 years 6 months ago

Heavy Rains Force Need For More Storage

kevin ruane, south florida water management district, Lake Okeechobee, st lucie estuaries, east orlando post, east orlando news, news east orlando, orlando news, news orlando, florida news, news florida, seminole county post, seminole county news,

The following is a letter written by City of Sanibel mayor Kevin Ruane to the other mayors of municipalities n Lee County on water issues. Crossposted from News Press.

 

By Kevin Ruane

 

An extremely wet January has pushed water levels in Lake Okeechobee to 16.22 feet as of Feb 2. With Lake Okeechobee rising into the “Intermediate” sub-band, the Army Corp of Engineers, in accordance with the 2008 Lake Okeechobee Regulation Schedule, began increased regulatory releases to the Caloosahatchee and St. Lucie estuaries on Saturday, Jan. 30.

 

The target flows are a constant release of 6,500 cubic feet into Caloosahatchee and a 2,800 into the St. Lucie, the maximum allowable releases under the current operation schedule. Although the City of Sanibel is extremely concerned about the potential impacts of these damaging releases to the Caloosahatchee and estuary, our beaches, our water quality and our economy, it is important that we send a consistent and factual message to the Corps, Southwest Florida Management District and the media about the reality of the impacts observed in our communities.

 

To further complicate the situation, the initiation of increased Lake Okeechobee regulatory releases comes on top of extensive wash-ups of marine life on local beaches due to high wind and storm conditions and moderate fish kills due to increased concentrations of red tide along some county beaches (a patchy red tide bloom has persisted from Pinellas County south to Lee County since late fall of 2015). While it may be tempting to blame all adverse water conditions on Lake Okeechobee releases, it is not accurate to do so. Red tide blooms are initiated offshore in the Gulf of Mexico and are not the result of Lake releases.

 

Water that appears brown in color is also not necessarily the result of Lake Okeechobee releases. Freshwater running off the land carries tannins from plants and other organic material that turn the water the dark brown color. Sediments from land runoff and enormous volumes of fast moving water result in increased turbidity. Despite the initiation of increased Lake Okeechobee regulatory releases, over the last four days approximately 70% of the current water flow is runoff from the Caloosahatchee watershed. While championing the need to move water from Lake Okeechobee to the south, the City of Sanibel has consistently recognized our need for water storage within the Caloosahatchee watershed.

 

In particular, the conditions over the last week have clearly illustrated how desperate this need remains. On Thursday, Jan. 28, flows at the Franklin Lock and dam measured 12,270 cfs, while outflows from Lake Okeechobee measured zero. That is, 100% of the flow in the Caloosahatchee was the result of runoff from the Caloosahatchee watershed, not Lake Okeechobee releases.

 

Conditions were similar on Friday, Jan. 30. Flows at the lock measured 14,280, while outflows from the lake remained at zero. Since the increased releases were initiated four days ago, flows at the lock have averaged 12,294, while outflows from the lake averaged 3,884, meaning the releases have accounted for only 30 percent of the total runoff. However, if and when watershed flow decreases, it is likely that we will continue to receive maximum lake discharges (6,500 cfs) for the foreseeable future. Average monthly flow greater than 6,500 measured in the Caloosahatchee whether from lake releases or watershed runoff, will result in mortality of marine organisms and seagrasses in Pine Island Sound and the Gulf of Mexico.

 

With above average rainfall conditions expected for another three months, it is imperative we explore all options to implement and maximize storage on all private lands including those currently under contract with the water management district for the dispersed water management program and utilize emergency storage on all public lands within the Kissimmee, Lake Okeechobee, St. Lucie and Caloosahatchee basins.

 

Within Lee County, potential opportunities for storage at the Bob Janes Preserve and other Lee County 20/20 or other available public lands must be explored. We must also challenge the Army Corps and the district o identify and exercise all operational flexibility within their power to hold more water in the Lake and other available storage areas. Specifically, this will include continued evaluation of the Lake O regulation schedule risk assessment to identify any opportunities to provide more storage to reduce discharges to the estuaries in light of ongoing improvements to the Herbert Hoover Dike.

 

Top